Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title IRELAND: POLITICAL, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL GEOGRAPHIES
Code ENVS399
Coordinator Dr ECM Lybeck
Institute of Irish Studies
Eleanor.Lybeck@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 6 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Aims

Students will develop their knowledge of Irish cultural geography from human settlement until the present. Students will gain insight into the impact of human activity on the Irish landscape. The module seeks to foster an undertanding of contemporary Irish identity,culture, society and politics. The module aims to develop students' skills of interdisciplinary study relating Ireland and it's past.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will obtain an overview of Irish cultural geography from human settlement until the present.

(LO2) Students will gain insight into the impact of human activity on the Irish landscape.

(LO3) Students will develop knowlege of contemporary Irish identity

(LO4) Students will develop interdisciplinary study skills.

(S1) Organisational skills

(S2) Communication skills

(S3) International awareness

(S4) Adaptability


Syllabus

 

Week 1: IN SEARCH OF IRELAND?
What is the meaning of Ireland and Irishness? And are readings of Ireland exclusivist? This workshop explores the complex geographical mosaic of overlapping cultures and senses of belonging.

Week 2: READING IRELAND
Building on the first week of the module, this workshop is aimed at reaching understandings about contested places, the nature of cultural landscapes and the symbolic construction of the geography of identity. It will examine the re-construction of power within society though tropes and narratives of belonging and the dichotomy between cultural landscapes, nationalist ideologies and symbolic geographies.

Week 3: THE FAMINE AND ITS AFTERMATH, 1840-2000
This workshop addresses the causes and effects of the Famine, issues of agrarian agitation, landlordism and subsequent emigration, as well as representations of the Famine in popular and cultural consciousness and how the Famine has been memorialised in Ireland, and be yond.

Week 4: CELTIC MYTH AND THE MODERN WORLD
This workshop looks at the role of myth in making images of Ireland and forming (imagined) communities of people. It attends at length to the turn-of-the-century ‘Celtic Revival’ and its construction of a mythic West of Ireland. It goes on to explore how those movements transformed in the twentieth century into institutions such as the Irish Folklore Commission and the Irish Tourist Board, along with recent high-profile parodies of the Revival.

Week 5: DECONSTRUCTING IRELAND/RECONSTRUCTING IRELAND, 1912-2023
This workshop considers historical moments and geographical locations when and where conceptions of Ireland have been contested. It will focus on the presence (or absence) of famous landmarks in Dublin and on recent events designed to re-enact versions of Ireland’s past on the streets of the capital.

Week 6: REVISION AND ESSAY SKILLS

Week 7: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE CELTIC TIGER < br/>What are the factors that led to the boom in Ireland’s economy from the 1990s to 2008? And why did the island’s economic fortunes undergo a rapid reversal from 2008?

Week 8: IRELAND’S ENCOUNTER WITH AUSTERITY AND THE CELTIC COMEBACK
This workshop considers the application and impact of austerity in Ireland.

Week 9: BREXIT AND IRELAND/ESSAY PREPARATION
Beyond the UK, Ireland – both North and South – is likely to be especially impacted by Brexit. Issues include altered trade flows, movement of people, border infrastructure, Unionist anxieties and a call for Irish Unification, and altered citizenship rules. Much preparation has been undertaken in Ireland to mitigate effects, but impacts are still liable to be significant and unpredictable. This workshop will explore the multiple ways in which Brexit has altered and is altering Irish society, politics, culture and economy.

Week 10: NORTHERN IRELAND 1968-1998: SPATIAL DIVISI ON AND POLITICAL VIOLENCE
This workshop introduces multiple sites of spatial division between the two Irelands and within Northern Ireland, and their role in perpetuating violence. It explored how identity is made complex by violence, victimhood, harm, and the pursuit of peace.

Week 11: NORTHERN IRELAND POST-1998/REVISION AND ESSAY PREPARATION
What is the impact of peace and conflict transformation in Northern Ireland? How can we explain changing voting patterns? How has (national) identity been reconceived since the Good Friday Agreement? And how has the relationship between space and peace been redefined?


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Asynchronous Online Lectures
Description: Weekly Lectures provided for students to watch asynchronously
Attendance Recorded: No

Teaching Method 2 - Synchronous Online Discussion Sessions
Description: Weekly ONline Discussion Sessions to support and develop asynchronous lecture content
Attendance Recorded: Yes


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours           10

20

30
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 120
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Essay Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Semester Two, week 6  2000 words    50       
Essay There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Semester Two, week 12  2000 words    50       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.