Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title SOCIAL AND SPATIAL INEQUALITIES
Code ENVS557
Coordinator Dr M Green
Geography and Planning
Mark.Green@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2020-21 Level 7 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Aims

Gain an understanding of several core areas of social and spatial inequalities and how these inter-relate, and to engage with academic debates about these issues;
Explore evidence for, and interpretations of, social and spatial inequalities, eg labour market, ethnic, spatial aspects of poverty;
Gain an understanding of the geographies of social inequalities, including why inequalities are not equal between places, and what the implications of this unevenness are for individuals and communities;
Consider how and why social inequalities have persisted and/or changed over time, with reference to allied theories and empirical evidence;
Gain acritical understanding of the meaning and measurement of inequalities, poverty and deprivation;
Identify and review the types of data sources that can be used to explore social and spatial inequalities ;
Explore the wider UK context for the development of social and spat ial inequalities, including economic restructuring and welfare reform;
Consider representations of inequalities in the media, policy and political debate;
Consider a number of policy developments/responses to problems of social and spatial inequalities, and to highlight their impact.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Develop anunderstanding of social and spatial inequalities, how these inter-relate, andhow the terms have been (mis-)used in academic, political, policy and public discourses

(LO2) Develop anunderstanding of how and why social and spatial inequalities might havepersisted over time, and review the empirical evidence for this 

(LO3) Understand how and why social inequalities havespecific geographies and can be concentrated in particular areas orneighbourhoods

(LO4) Understand the difficulties in defining andmeasuring social and spatial inequalities, and how such definitions may relateto broader theories, perspectives or frameworks of relevance

(LO5) Gain insightinto a range of government responses that have been developed to combat socialinequalities and related issues in the UK, at the regional and sub-regionallevel

(S1) Problem solving skills

(S2) Organisational skills

(S3) Communication skills

(S4) International awareness

(S5) Lifelong learning skills

(S6) Ethical awareness


Syllabus

 

As a guide, lectures will include themes such as:
Introducing Core Concepts: Social and Spatial Inequalities, Poverty;
Inequalities and the Labour Market i: Unemployment and In-work Poverty;
Inequalities and the Labour Market ii. Immigration, Commuting and the Spatiality of Labour Markets;
Ethnic Inequalities i: What is Ethnicity and Why Measure It?
Ethnic Inequalities ii: Socio-economic Inequalities and their Explanations;
Ethnic Inequalities iii: Segregation and Neighbourhood;
People and Places: Contextual vs Compositional Explanations of Poverty;
Measuring Poverty and Deprivation;
Theories about Inequality i: The Spirit Level;
Theories about Inequality ii: Evidence Post Spirit Level;
Theories about Inequality iii: Sociological Explanations.
An important link between the core areas of social and spatial inequalities covered is in considering how different forms of inequalities operate together. Each lecture will include insight into how these inequalities might have changed over time, their relevant policy-political context, and the wider academic debates on these themes. Specific case studies and empirical evidence will be drawn upon to aid understanding of the different domains of social and spatial inequalities. Library resources will be accessible through the module reading list, with students expected to find their own supplementary resources and to read widely around the topic, drawing on academic and policy literature. Students will be expected to complete independent reading in preparation for seminars. The module consists of lectures and workshops. Some lectures will include interactive sessions such as reading sessions and in-class discussions.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: Lectures, including interactive reading seminars and discussions in some sessions
Attendance Recorded: Yes

Teaching Method 2 - Workshop
Description: Workshops to support understanding of the lecture content and assessment
Attendance Recorded: Yes


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours           18

18
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 132
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Assessment 1 There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Second; week 8  2,500 words    50       
Assessment 2 There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Second  2,500 words    50       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.