Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title QUEER FILM, VIDEO AND DOCUMENTARY
Code COMM305
Coordinator Mr GW Needham
Communication and Media
Gary.Needham@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2020-21 Level 6 FHEQ First Semester 15

Aims

To introduce students to queer theory and queer politics through the history and analysis of the production and reception of moving images. To encourage students to develop advanced moving image analysis skills and use them to differentiate between the forms and practices of film, video and documentary. To introduce key concepts and key theories around LGBTQ+ identity as historically, culturally, and politically situated. To encourage students to widen their knowledge and understanding of LGBTQ+ equality and diversity through the theory, history, ethics, and politics of queer moving images. 


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will demonstrate a detailed knowledge of queer film, video and documentary.

(LO2) Students will demonstrate familiarity with key concepts and debates in queer theory.

(LO3) Students will demonstrate skills in advanced moving image analysis.

(LO4) Students will demonstrate a practical ability to conceive of a thematic queer film season for an LGBT+ film festival with underpinning rationale and theory.

(S1) Organisational skills.

(S2) International awareness.

(S3) Ethical awareness.

(S4) Commercial awareness.

(S5) Problem solving skills.


Syllabus

 

[1] FOUNDATIONS/POLITICS/THEORIES The first block will examine the foundational scholars in queer theory such as Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Judith Butler, and Leo Bersani who have introduced new and different ways of thinking about sexuality and gender. These queer theories, concepts, and frameworks will be related to specific moving image texts that have been central to the development of thinking and theorising queerly. Indicatively, such examples of theories and films may include gender performativity and Paris is Burning , the closet and Brokeback  Mountain , lesbian reception practices and The Haunting , and intersectionality and Tangerine . [2] THE AIDS CRISIS The greatest impact on queer life and queer moving images was the AIDS crisis of the 1980s and it is this historical trauma that ‘invented’ the queer subject and queer identity. The AIDS crisis exacerbated new prejudices and homophobias fomented by the New Right, but out of ‘ ;crisis’ was forged new politics and new theories. This block will examine the different moving image responses to AIDS (indicatively the melodramas Longtime Companion and The Normal Heart , activist videos such Fast Trip, Long Drop , and testimonial documentaries How to Survive a Plague and  United Anger ) alongside key critical theories  of the the AIDS crisis. [3] HISTORIES AND MOVEMENTS  The final block will focus on specific movements, histories, and individuals who have shaped queer moving image culture in the post-war years - a shift from radical beginnings to mainstream acceptance.  Beginning with the underground cinema of the 1960s through to the most canonical moment of queer filmmaking in the New Queer Cinema of the 1990s. Since the 2000s, queer films have become increasingly mainstream, queer politics have given way to assimilation and marriage, queer theories are now universal rather than specific, often transnational and global, and queer films such as Carol , Moonlight , and Call Me By Your Name are award-winning multiplex favourites though, significantly, elide what was once defined as queer. What is the future of queer theory, is queer still a useful concept, and what is the queer moving image now? These questions are central to the conclusion of this module which will respond to the most contemporary queer films, politics and theories at the time of teaching.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Teaching Method 1 - Lecture
Description: 50 minute lecture that will introduce a weekly topic
Attendance Recorded: No
Notes: The lectures will introduce topics, themes, theories, perspectives and case studies.

Teaching Method 2 - Workshop
Description: 180 minute workshop that will integrate a weekly screening and post-screening discussion.
Attendance Recorded: No
Notes: This is a weekly three-hour workshop that will include the screening of film, video and/or documentary in the first half of the session. The second half of the session will be a 45 minute discussion.

Unscheduled Directed Student Hours (time spent away from the timetabled sessions but directed by the teaching staff): 12


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 12

        36

12

60
Timetable (if known)              
Private Study 90
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Film Festival Project There is a resit opportunity. Standard UoL penalty applies for late submission. This is an anonymous assessment. Assessment Schedule (When) :Week 12  3000 minutes.    100       

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.