Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN USING AN OBJECT-ORIENTED APPROACH
Code CKIT515
Coordinator Prof FP Coenen
Computer Science
Coenen@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2017-18 Level 7 FHEQ Whole Session 15

Aims

  1. To provide the software skills and technical knowledge required to model software systems using the object-oriented approach to system analysis and design.

     

  2. To provide students with the ability to build models of software systems and criticaly analyse those models, using the object-oriented approach.


Learning Outcomes

A critical understanding of the theoretical concepts underpinning Object-Oriented (OO) analysis and design.

A critical understanding of the use of the general-purpose Unified Modeling Language (UML) in the context of software system analysis and design.

 

An understanding of the significance and practice of software requirements gathering.

 

An understanding of the use OO models to communicate information about software systems.

An ability to developed software models and evaluate critically  such models, using an object-oriented.

 

Be ability to model a system''s functionality using the concept of cases.

 


Syllabus

Week1: Introduction to object-oriented analysis and design

This seminar will review the basic concepts of object technology, introduce systems development ideas and introduce the case studies to be used throughout the module.  In relation to systems development ideas, issues and problems will be summarised and strategies for dealing with these will be introduced.  Two case studies are used throughout the textbook to provide examples of applying techniques; the business background for these case studies will be introduced this week.

Week2: Modeling and gathering requirements

This seminar will look at what is meant by modelling and the purpose of using diagrams to describe models.  It will also look at requirements gathering, employing use cases as a technique for understanding and documenting what the client wants the system to do.

Week 3: Problem domain analysis

This seminar will look at analysing the problem domain.  In this seminar, you will learn how to find classes from the use case requirements and to produce an analysis class model of the problem domain

Weel 4: System analysis

This seminar looks at the analysis model in more detail, considering how objects work together.  You will learn how to model the details of objects, including their actions and states.

Week 5: Object-oriented design

This seminar considers how to elaborate your existing analysis model to produce a concrete design model.  You will learn how to move from analysis to design, considering high-level issues such as software architecture and more detailed issues related to class structure.

Week 6: Design patterns and data persistence

This seminar covers analysis and design patterns in some depth, allowing you to start using patterns.  Most large systems, and almost all business applications, work with a large amount of data that are stored and used for long periods of time.  This seminar will consider approaches and strategies for storing and managing large volumes of data and how to work with this data in a program.

Week 7: Detailed design and implementation issues

This seminar considers how to design maintainable software with a clear separation between the user interface and the logic.  This seminar also deals with issues related to deploying and installing a software system.


Week 8: Component reuse and software development processes
This final seminar concludes the curriculum by pulling together the modelling techniques and UML diagrams and considering their use within a disciplined process or method of software development.  Issues related to the difficulties and benefits of reusing software components are also raised






Teaching and Learning Strategies

Virtual classroom hours (for online modules) -

Number of hours per week that students are expected to attend the virtual classroom so as to participate in discussion, dedicated to group work and individual assessment is 8.75.

Non-classroom hours (for online modules) -

Number of hours per week that students are expected to devote to reading, research and other individual work to support engagement in the classroom is 10.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours           70

80

150
Timetable (if known)           Number of hours per week that students are expected to attend the virtual classroom so as to participate in discussion, dedicated to group work and individual assessment is 8.75.
Number of hours per week that students are expected to devote to reading, research and other individual work to support engagement in the classroom is 10.
 
 
Private Study 0
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Coursework  Weekly Discussion Qu  Whole Session  35  No reassessment opportunity  Standard UoL penalty applies  Assessment 1 There is no reassessment opportunity, The nature of the adopted online learning paradigm is such that no reassessment opportunity is available; instead students failing the module will be offered the opportunity to retake the entire module. 
Coursework  Weekly Coursework As  Whole Session  30  No reassessment opportunity  Standard UoL penalty applies  Assessment 2 There is no reassessment opportunity, The nature of the adopted online learning paradigm is such that no reassessment opportunity is available; instead students failing the module will be offered the opportunity to retake the entire module. 
Coursework  8 week individual an  Whole Session  35  No reassessment opportunity  Standard UoL penalty applies  Assessment 3 There is no reassessment opportunity, The nature of the adopted online learning paradigm is such that no reassessment opportunity is available; instead students failing the module will be offered the opportunity to retake the entire module. Notes (applying to all assessments) 1) Due to nature of on-line mode of instruction this work is not marked anonymously. 2) Students who fail the module have the opportunity to repeat the entire module. 3) The "Standard UoL Penalty" for late submission that applies is the "Standard UoL Penalty" agreed with respect to online programmes offered in collaboration with Laureate Online Education.  

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.
Explanation of Reading List:

The online programmes offered by the department of Computer Science in Collaboration with Laureate Online Education use online materials wherever possible including the online resources available within the University of Liverpool’s libraries. This module does not require a specific text book.