Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title DESIGNING AND MANAGING DATABASES
Code CKIT504
Coordinator Prof FP Coenen
Computer Science
Coenen@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2017-18 Level 7 FHEQ Whole Session 15

Aims

  1. To provide students with a critical understanding of the design and realisation of relational database systems.
  2. To provide students with an in depth understanding of the operation (storage, manipulation, querying) of relational databases. 
  3. To provide students with an understanding of alternative database paradigms (parallel, distributed, object-oriented).
  4. To provide students with an understanding of the administration and maintenance of database systems.

Learning Outcomes

An in depth understanding of the design and implementation of relational database systems.
An ability to use database design techniques such as Entity-Relation diagrams and "normal forms".
A comprehensive understanding of client-server architectures.

A systematic understanding of the operation of database query systems.

A critical understanding of database administration issues including security, integrity issues, and backup procedures.
A wide ranging  understanding of the operation of multi-user systems.

A critical understanding of alternative database system paradigms.

 


Syllabus

Week 1: Database Concepts

The fundamentals of database system. The evolution of database systems from computer file systems. The idea of database design as a crucial first step in the development and proper use of database systems. The use of Database Management Systems (DBMS) and their functionality. Different types of database systems.

 

Week 2: The Relational Database Model

The basic idea of relational database systems. Relational table components and characteristics. The concept of “keys” and their usage in relational database environments. Relational database operators. The concept of the data dictionary. Basic entity relationships.

 

Week 3: Structured Query Language

The basics of the Structured Query Language (SQL). Creating database and table structures, perform various types of data manipulation and data administration using SQL. Relational set operators in SQL and how those operators are used to merge the results of multiple queries. Extracting information from multiple tables.

 

Week 4: Entity-Relationship Modelling

The data modelling aspect of database design using Entity Relationship Diagrams (ERDs). Database modelling tools. Conflicting goals in database design, and design compromises.

 

Week 5: Normalisation of Database Tables< /p>

The design and evaluation of good table structures to control data redundancies and avoid data anomalies. The process of “normalisation”. Normalisation techniques.

 

Week 6: Advanced Database Concepts

The main database transaction properties and how SQL can be used to represent transactions. The use of transaction logs to ensure a DBMS’s ability to recover transactions. Concurrency control and DBMS scheduling to enforces concurrency control. The fundamentals of distributed database systems.

 

Week 7: Client/Server Systems

The components of client/server computing and how their interaction effects database design, implementation, and management.

 

Week 8: The Data Warehouse

The idea of data warehousing. The concepts and components, and the various architectures, involved in data warehousing.The tools available to support data warehousing. Advanced data analysis using OnLine Analytical Processing (OLAP). The potential of data mining.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Virtual classroom hours (for online modules) -

Number of hours per week that students are expected to attend the virtual classroom so as to participate in discussion, dedicated to group work and individual assessment is 8.75.

Non-classroom hours (for online modules) -

Number of hours per week that students are expected to devote to reading, research and other individual work to support engagement in the classroom is 10.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours           70

80

150
Timetable (if known)           Number of hours per week that students are expected to attend the virtual classroom so as to participate in discussion, dedicated to group work and individual assessment is 8.75.
Number of hours per week that students are expected to devote to reading, research and other individual work to support engagement in the classroom is 10.
 
 
Private Study 0
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Coursework  Weekly Discussion Qu  Whole Session  30  No reassessment opportunity  Standard UoL penalty applies  Assessment 1 There is no reassessment opportunity, The nature of the adopted online learning paradigm is such that no reassessment opportunity is available; instead students failing the module will be offered the opportunity to retake the entire module. 
Coursework  Weekly Hand In Assig  Whole Session  70  No reassessment opportunity  Standard UoL penalty applies  Assessment 2 There is no reassessment opportunity, The nature of the adopted online learning paradigm is such that no reassessment opportunity is available; instead students failing the module will be offered the opportunity to retake the entire module. Notes (applying to all assessments) 1) Due to nature of the on-line mode of instruction this work is not marked anonymously. 2) Students who fail the module have the opportunity to repeat the entire module. 3) The "Standard UoL Penalty" for late submission that applies is the "Standard UoL Penalty" agreed with respect to online programmes offered in collaboration with Laureate Online Education.  

Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.
Explanation of Reading List:

The online programmes offered by the department of Computer Science in Collaboration with Laureate Online Education use online materials wherever possible including the online resources available within the University of Liverpool’s libraries. This module does not require a specific text book.