ULMS Electronic Module Catalogue

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title Labour Economics
Code ECON702
Coordinator Dr IC Burn
Economics
Ian.Burn@liverpool.ac.uk
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2021-22 Level 7 FHEQ Second Semester 15

Pre-requisites before taking this module (other modules and/or general educational/academic requirements):

 

Modules for which this module is a pre-requisite:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on a required basis:

 

Programme(s) (including Year of Study) to which this module is available on an optional basis:

 

Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 12

6

      12

6

36
Timetable (if known) 60 mins X 1 totaling 12
 
60 mins X 1 totaling 6
 
      60 mins X 1 totaling 12
60 mins X 1 totaling 6
 
 
Private Study 114
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Examination Reassessment Opportunity: Yes Penalty for Late Submission: Standard UoL penalty applies Anonymous Assessment: Yes  24 hours    50       
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Individual Data Analysis Report Reassessment Opportunity: Yes Penalty for Late Submission: Standard UoL penalty applies Anonymous Assessment: No (students will be required to submit their code whic  -1000 words    50       

Aims

The module aims to prepare students for careers where a good understanding of microeconometric analysis is key. The topics covered in this module will prepare students to work in economic consulting, data analytics, civil service, and industry. The focus on theory underpinning policy and then empirically testing the impact of policy exposes students to the way policy-oriented research is conducted. This systematic approach reinforces the skills they have learned in other modules but brings them all together in a way that teaches students to be well rounded economists.


Learning Outcomes

(LO1) Students will be able to model supply of labour by individuals and demand for labour by firms in competitive and uncompetitive environments.

(LO2) Students will be able to program empirical analyses in STATA.

(LO3) Students will be able to read and discuss empirical analyses conducted by other researchers.

(LO4) Students will be able to quantify the effects of labour market policies.

(LO5) Students will be able to discuss the distributional impact of policies on different groups.

(S1) Problem solving
The module teaches students to define a research hypothesis and empirically test it through discussions in lectures and seminars and written assignments.

(S2) Verbal and written communication
The module teaches student to discuss research on labour market policies through discussions in lecture and seminars and written assignments.

(S3) Numeracy
The module teaches students empirical skills to analyse public policy through lectures and seminars.

(S4) IT skills
Seminars will teach students how to program empirical analyses in STATA.

(S5) International awareness
Examples covered in this class will draw on labour markets from a number of countries.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

Hybrid delivery, with social distancing on campus.

1 hour online asynchronous learning per week x 12 weeks
1 hour face-to-face synchronous lecture per week x 12 weeks
1 hour face-to-face seminar every other week x 6 weeks
1 hour face-to-face peer-to-peer learning every other week (unscheduled) x 6 weeks
Self-directed learning x 114 hours

Students will need to spend time reading assigned academic papers and policy reports. Significant time will also need to be spent coding in STATA in order to build their skills and prepare them for assignments.


Syllabus

 

Core Topics:

1. Labour Supply
2. Labour Demand
3. Wages and Compensation
4. Unemployment
5. Labour Market Policies

The theoretical models discussed in this module build on the material, skills, and concepts discussed in Microeconomics. The empirical analyses build on the Econometrics and Statistics module in First Semester. Empirical analyses discussed complement the material discussed in Applied Microeconometrics, but introduce new data sources, teach how to apply the methods in a wider range of applications, and highlight more advanced empirical tools as they relate to labour economics.

Course material, such as datasets, supplementary readings, and additional learning materials, will be posted on Canvas. The required textbook covers the theoretical underpinnings of labour economics, while the supplemental material which will be posted on Canvas consists mainly of published papers that cover the empirical applications of the the ories. Students are expected to read the textbook and supplemental material before lectures and seminars. The suggested textbooks contain the material students will need to learn to master the empirical skills taught in the course and are a resource for refreshing their knowledge of econometrics. The bulk of the empirical work will focus on learning to code in STATA. Resources for programming in STATA will be posted on Canvas. This will include examples of do-files, pre-packaged programs, and self-directed learning materials to assist in learning to code. Many of the modules on the programme utilise STATA, therefore, students will be able to draw on resources from many different modules to help master the empirical skills.


Recommended Texts

Reading lists are managed at readinglists.liverpool.ac.uk. Click here to access the reading lists for this module.