Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title CRITICAL READING FOR RESEARCH
Code ENGL690
Coordinator Dr MA Mahlberg
School of English
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2008-09 M Level Second Semester 15

Aims

The aims of the module are:

 ·        to guide students towards wider independent reading around a range of areas within linguistics

 ·        to develop their ability to read research literature critically and with an understanding of the context within which the research is placed

 ·        to provide them with an opportunity to set up and guide discussion around key publications that they have selected

 ·        to prepare them for the extensive critical reading of relevant research which will be required for their dissertation


Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module, students will be able to demonstrate the ability:

·        to identify worthwhile research publications that are relevant to their own research

 ·        to provide an informed account of how the publications are relevant

 ·        to discuss the publications critically and to evaluate their validity, centrality and impact

 ·        to analyse and account for the points of contact and of divergence between publications on related topics


Syllabus

N/A 

There is no syllabus as such, since the selection of materials varies depending on the students’ research topics. It is expected that the following skills will be practised at regular points in the module:

 - identifying relevant research publications

 - approaching the reading of research critically

 - assessing the ‘respectability’ of sources

 - comparing and contrasting different sources

 - identifying key issues in research and guiding colleagues towards focused discussion of these issues


Teaching and Learning Strategies

The sessions will be based on the critical discussion of pre-agreed readings. The first readings will be selected and presented by tutors in order to model the kind of approach expected; but, as soon as is feasible, the selection will be handed over to the students. Each student will be responsible for organising the handling of at least one paper during the semester: this will involve selecting the paper, drawing up questions and points for discussion for the rest of the group, and identifying and reading other related papers so that they are able to act as informants for the rest of the group where necessary on the topics covered. The publications that each student selects will normally be ones which are directly relevant to the research that they will be carrying out for their dissertation; but the module is designed to ensure that they will also be reading more widely across a range of areas within linguistics, thus counteracting the natural tendency to spe cialise too narrowly as they begin to focus on the dissertation.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours   12

        12
Timetable (if known)   1x 1hr seminar per week
 
         
Private Study 138
TOTAL HOURS 150

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
Critical Review of 4 papers around a topic agreed with tutor (3,000 words)    second  100  Standard  Standard University Policy applies - see Department/School handbook for details.   

Recommended Texts

Scott, M. 2000, “Research Design”, in-house paper, 49 pp.

Scott, M. 2000, “Research Design”, in-house paper, 49 pp.