Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title CURRENT ISSUES IN CORPUS LINGUISTICS
Code ENGL686
Coordinator Dr MA Mahlberg
School of English
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2008-09 M Level Second Semester 30

Aims

 

  • to integrate corpus linguistics work with other areas of linguistics
  • to raise questions about the appropriateness of certain types of corpus linguistic investigation for answering certain types of question
  • to show areas where corpus linguistics thinking is leading to new ways of thinking about language
  • to open avenues for exploration for the students
  • to develop corpus-linguistic-specific research skills

Learning Outcomes

On completing the module, the student should be able to:

  • discuss and evaluate key questions in current linguistics
  • formulate theoretical questions of his/her own & test them
  • articulate the relationships(s) between corpus linguistic practice and theoretical positions informed by corpus linguistic practice
  • participate as a fully-fledged junior member of the corpus linguistic community

Syllabus

N/A 

It is intended that this module should reflect current issues and controversies in corpus linguistic practice and theory. We would expect the topics covered in any year to change slightly over a five year period. At the present time we would expect to cover all of the following topics

  • How local grammars account better for grammatical facts than general grammars, and the limitations of local grammar thinking
  • The implications of collocation and colligation for theories of the way language is stored mentally
  • How corpus linguistic methodology casts new lights on, and problematises, theories of style, register, genre, sociolect and dialect
  • The implications of corpus linguistic findings for existing theories of language, and the development of new corpus-driven theories (esp. lexical priming the ory)
  • How (and whether) corpus linguistic analysis can illuminate both everyday and literary creativity
  • The implications of key word analysis for theories of topic
  • Whether corpus linguistics can say anything about pragmatics
The final five weeks will be devoted to sample case studies, with the focus on theoretically challenging or practically groundbreaking work.

Teaching and Learning Strategies

Lecture & illustration & practical tasks in workshop


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 12

12

        24
Timetable (if known) 1 x 1 hr lecture per week
 
1 x 1hr seminar per week
 
         
Private Study 276
TOTAL HOURS 300

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
6000 word project    Second semester  100  standard  Standard University Policy applies - see Department/School handbook for details.   

Recommended Texts

Barlow, Michael (2000) ‘Usage, Blends, and Grammar’ in M. Barlow and S. Kemmer (eds.) Usage-Based Models of Language. Stanford: Center for the Study of Language and  Information, pp. 315-344

Carter, Ron (2004) Language and Creativity: The Art of Common Talk, London: Routledge

Hoey, Michael (2005) Lexical Priming: A New Theory of Words and Language, London: Routledge

Hopper, P (1998) ‘Emergent grammar’ in M Tomasello (ed) The New Psychology of Language, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp 155-175

Hunston, Susan & Gill Francis (2000) Pattern Grammar, Amsterdam: John Benjamins

Lee, David : Bookmarks for corpus-based linguists (web site): http://devoted.to/corpora

 Mahlberg, Michaela (2005, forthcoming) English General Nouns: A corpus theoretical approach,Amsterdam: Benjamins.

 Partington, Alan (2003) The Linguistics of Political Argument: the Spin-doctor and the Wolf-pack at the White House, London: Routledge

Mike Scott & Chris Tribble (2006) Working with Text, Amsterdam: John Benjamins

Sinclair, John  (2004) Trust the Text: Language, Corpus and Discourse, London: Routledge

Stubbs, Michael (1996) Text and Corpus Analysis, Oxford: Blackwell

Tognini-Bonelli, Elena (2001) Corpus Linguistics at Work, Amsterdam: John Benjamins

Barlow, Michael (2000) ‘Usage, Blends, and Grammar’ in M. Barlow and S. Kemmer (eds.) Usage-Based Models of Language. Stanford: Center for the Study of Language and  Information, pp. 315-344

Carter, Ron (2004) Language and Creativity: The Art of Common Talk, London: Routledge

Hoey, Michael (2005) Lexical Priming: A New Theory of Words and Language, London: Routledge

Hopper, P (1998) ‘Emergent grammar’ in M Tomasello (ed) The New Psychology of Language, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pp 155-175

Hunston, Susan & Gill Francis (2000) Pattern Grammar, Amsterdam: John Benjamins

Lee, David : Bookmarks for corpus-based linguists (web site): http://devoted.to/corpora

 Mahlberg, Michaela (2005, forthcoming) English General Nouns: A corpus theoretical approach,Amsterdam: Benjamins.

 Partington, Alan (2003) The Linguistics of Political Argument: the Spin-doctor and the Wolf-pack at the White House, London: Routledge

Mike Scott & Chris Tribble (2006) Working with Text, Amsterdam: John Benjamins

Sinclair, John  (2004) Trust the Text: Language, Corpus and Discourse, London: Routledge

Stubbs, Michael (1996) Text and Corpus Analysis, Oxford: Blackwell

Tognini-Bonelli, Elena (2001) Corpus Linguistics at Work, Amsterdam: John Benjamins