Module Details

The information contained in this module specification was correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change, either during the session because of unforeseen circumstances, or following review of the module at the end of the session. Queries about the module should be directed to the member of staff with responsibility for the module.
Title LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
Code ENGL383
Coordinator Dr MA Mahlberg
School of English
Year CATS Level Semester CATS Value
Session 2008-09 Level Three Second Semester 30

Aims

The main aims of this module are to develop students' awareness of:

- ways in which linguistic analysis can be used as an approach to literary texts;

- effects of social and historical aspects of language on the production and reception of literary texts;

- alternative definitions of 'literariness' as a linguistic property of certain texts or alternatively as a cultural marker.


Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module, the students will be able to:

demonstrate ability to apply a range of appropriate means of linguistic analysis to literary texts;

demonstrate familiarity with competing notions of 'the literary' and ability to engage criticaly with these;

demonstrate sensitivity to the possibility of a range of different readings of specific literary texts, including the use of appropriate critical terminologies.


Syllabus

TBA 

·         Stylistic analysis

·         Focalisation and point of view in narrative texts

·         Metaphor and other figures of speech

·         Clusters (i.e. repeated phrases) and characterisation

·         Key words in drama

·         Pragmatics and dialogue

·         ‘Voice images’ and ideology

·         The structuralist tradition of literary theory

·         The logical status of fictional texts

·         Gendered language and écriture feminine.


Teaching and Learning Strategies

One one-hour lecture and one two-hour seminar per week. Lectures will be used to introduce general themes, theories or approaches. Seminars will normally have a maximum of nine students and will provide the opportunity for group discussion, typically with a detailed focus on specific issues or on the analysis of particular texts.

Non-assessed work is required, which may include essays, essay plans and tutorial presentations. This has two formative functions: a) to provide students with the opportunity to practise their writing skills without the pressures of assessment, and b) to produce material which can serve as a preliminary draft for assessed work. Non-assessed presentations by students encourage confidence and fluency in discussion.

For both assessed and non-assessed work you will work with texts of your own choice (e.g. a novel, or poem) applying theories and methods presented in the module.


Teaching Schedule

  Lectures Seminars Tutorials Lab Practicals Fieldwork Placement Other TOTAL
Study Hours 12

24

        36
Timetable (if known) TBA
 
           
Private Study 264
TOTAL HOURS 300

Assessment

EXAM Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
             
CONTINUOUS Duration Timing
(Semester)
% of
final
mark
Resit/resubmission
opportunity
Penalty for late
submission
Notes
essay 1  4000 words   50  University regulations  University penalties apply   
essay 2   4000 words  50  University regulations  University penalties apply    

Recommended Texts

It is recommended that you buy the following:

Leech, G. & Short, M. 1981. Style in Fiction. London: Longman.

Further recommended texts:

Chapman, S. 2002. ‘“From their point of view”: voice and speech in George Moore’s Esther Waters’, Language and Literature, 11: 307-323.

Fludernik, M. 1993. The Fictions of Language and the Languages of Fiction: The linguistic representation of speech and consciousness. London: Routledge.

Fowler, R. 1986. Linguistic Criticism. Oxford: OxfordUniversity Press

Gilbert, S. & Gubar, S. 1988. The War of the Words: No Man’s Land the place of the woman writer in the C20th vol.1New Haven: Yale University Press.

Mahlber g, M. 2007. “Corpus stylistics: bridging the gap between linguistic and literary studies”. In Hoey, M., Mahlberg, M., Stubbs, M., Teubert, W. Text, Discourse and Corpora. London: Continuum.

Moi, T. 1999. What is a Woman Oxford: OUP, 1999 (paperback 2001, also available as Sex

Gender and the Body: the student edition of What is a Woman? This contains the first two essays of the full book)

Short, M. 1996. Exploring the Language of Poems, Plays and Prose. London: Longman.

Stockwell, P. 2002. Cognitive Poetics. An Introduction.London: Routledge.

Thompson, G. 1994. Reporting: Collins COBUILD English Guides 5. London: HarperCollins (esp. Chapter5).

Thompson, G. 1996. “Voices in the text: discourse perspectives on language repor ts” Applied Linguistics 17/4: 501-30

Toolan, M. 2001. Narrative: A Critical Linguistic Introduction. London: Routledge, 2nd edition.

 E-journal:

Language and Literature

A detailed list will be provided before the start of the module, usually there is also a novel on the reading that is used to illustrate techniques of stylistic analysis.

It is recommended that you buy the following:

Leech, G. & Short, M. 1981. Style in Fiction. London: Longman.

Further recommended texts:

Chapman, S. 2002. ‘“From their point of view”: voice and speech in George Moore’s Esther Waters’, Language and Literature, 11: 307-323.

Fludernik, M. 1993. The Fictions of Language and the Languages of Fiction: The linguistic representation of speech and consciousness. London: Routledge.

Fowler, R. 1986. Linguistic Criticism. Oxford: OxfordUniversity Press

Gilbert, S. & Gubar, S. 1988. The War of the Words: No Man’s Land the place of the woman writer in the C20th vol.1New Haven: Yale University Press.

Mahlber g, M. 2007. “Corpus stylistics: bridging the gap between linguistic and literary studies”. In Hoey, M., Mahlberg, M., Stubbs, M., Teubert, W. Text, Discourse and Corpora. London: Continuum.

Moi, T. 1999. What is a Woman Oxford: OUP, 1999 (paperback 2001, also available as Sex

Gender and the Body: the student edition of What is a Woman? This contains the first two essays of the full book)

Short, M. 1996. Exploring the Language of Poems, Plays and Prose. London: Longman.

Stockwell, P. 2002. Cognitive Poetics. An Introduction.London: Routledge.

Thompson, G. 1994. Reporting: Collins COBUILD English Guides 5. London: HarperCollins (esp. Chapter5).

Thompson, G. 1996. “Voices in the text: discourse perspectives on language repor ts” Applied Linguistics 17/4: 501-30

Toolan, M. 2001. Narrative: A Critical Linguistic Introduction. London: Routledge, 2nd edition.

 E-journal:

Language and Literature

A detailed list will be provided before the start of the module, usually there is also a novel on the reading that is used to illustrate techniques of stylistic analysis.