What is public engagement?

The National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement defines public engagement (PE) as:

"Public engagement describes the myriad of ways in which the activity and benefits of higher education and research can be shared with the public. Engagement is by definition a two-way process, involving interaction and listening, with the goal of generating mutual benefit."

There are lots of different ways to engage from running an activity at a science festival, to giving a talk about science at your local pub to involving patients in helping to design a research project. There are also lots of different publics (we would define the public as anyone not formally connected to the University) and some public engagement activities may be open to everyone, whilst others may be targeted at a particular audience such as school students.

Public engagement activities are generally carried out for at least one of the following reasons:

  1. To transmit knowledge to others - to inspire, inform, change, educate, build capacity and involvement or influence decisions of the public
  2. To receive knowledge from others - to use the views, skills, experiences, knowledge of the public to inspire, inform, change, educate or build your own capacity or decisions
  3. To collaborate with others - to consider, create or decide something together with the public

The National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement defines public engagement (PE) as:

"Public engagement describes the myriad of ways in which the activity and benefits of higher education and research can be shared with the public. Engagement is by definition a two-way process, involving interaction and listening, with the goal of generating mutual benefit."

There are lots of different ways to engage from running an activity at a science festival, to giving a talk about science at your local pub to involving patients in helping to design a research project. There are also lots of different publics (we would define the public as anyone not formally connected to the University) and some public engagement activities may be open to everyone, whilst others may be targeted at a particular audience such as school students.

Public engagement activities are generally carried out for at least one of the following reasons:

  1. To transmit knowledge to others - to inspire, inform, change, educate, build capacity and involvement or influence decisions of the public
  2. To receive knowledge from others - to use the views, skills, experiences, knowledge of the public to inspire, inform, change, educate or build your own capacity or decisions
  3. To collaborate with others - to consider, create or decide something together with the public