Postgraduates

Alexandros Alexiou

Alexandros Alexiou

'Putting “Geo” into Geodemographics: Evaluating the Importance of Spatial Proximity and Context for National Classification Performance'
ESRC (NW-DTC: Geography and Environment, Advanced Quantitative Methods)
Supervisors: Prof Alex Singleton, Dr Paul Williamson
Description: My research project explores the creation of new models of urban socio-spatial structure that better account for both geographic context and the dynamics of population, redefining the standard methods through which geodemographic classifications are created. My research focuses on clustering methods, and I use geocomputational and programming tools, such as R and Python to model and evaluate socio-spatial structure. As a member of the Geographical Data Science Lab and the Consumer Data Research Centre (CDRC), I am also particularly interested in any geographical “big data” and open data sources that can be used in population analyses. - Email Alexiou

You can find out more about my research here: http://geographicdatascience.com

Rebecca Allan

Rebecca Allan

'Residential Context, Health and Mortality: The Effect of Context, Composition or Selective Migration?'
ESRC North West Doctorial Training Centre Studentship- Social Statistics Pathway AQM
Supervisors: Dr Paul Williamson, Prof Hill Kulu & Dr Chris Lloyd
Description: Research demonstrates that health and mortality vary considerably by residential location. Previous studies in the UK demonstrate poorer health and higher mortality in the North and West, compared to the South and East. The results regarding urban-rural variation, a further dimension of residential context, are less conclusive. This project aims to investigate health and mortality by residential context within Britain, determining if and how health and mortality varies over the urban-rural continuum, and to what extent these spatial variations can be attributed to compositional contextual, and migratory influences. - Email Rebecca

Hakim Danial

Hakim Danial

'Population change and migration in Kuala Lumpur Conurbation, Malaysia'
Ministry of Higher Education Malaysia / Universiti Teknologi MARA
Supervisors: Prof Hill Kulu, Dr. Paul Williamson, Dr. Daniel Arribas-Bel 
Description: In today’s world, living in the city centre is desirable and preferable because it provides more economic and social opportunities to people who live in it. However, according to several studies, the population growth of the main city centres in Malaysia such as Kuala Lumpur, Johor Bahru, and Georgetown has decreased significantly for about three decades from year 1970 until 2010. It has resulted to the increase of population in suburbs which reduce the function and efficiency of the city centre. Therefore, this research tends to focus on the characteristics and factors of the population changes and internal migration by small areas in Kuala Lumpur Conurbation. - Email Hakim

Emily Dearden

Emily Dearden

'Exploring the connections between area deprivation and health using consistent small area Census datasets, 1971-2011'
ESRC North West Doctoral Training Centre Studentship – Social Statistics Pathway AQM
Supervisors: Dr Chris Lloyd, Dr Gemma Catney & Prof Tarani Chandola
Description: This investigation takes a consistent geographical and temporal approach to identifying and understanding areas of persistent deprivation and ill-health. With access to an innovative consistent small area Census dataset (for 1971, 1981, 1991, 2001 and 2011), this study will provide the first geographically fine-grained analysis of persistent area deprivation and ill-health in the UK. This project will seek to identify and study small areas which have been amongst the consistently most deprived in absolute terms over time, and explore the relationship between area deprivation and persistent health inequalities. The geographical approach of this research is novel and will provide new insights into the complex relationship between deprivation and health. - Email Emily

Sebastian Franke

Sebastian Franke

'Partnership status, health and mortality: Protection or Selection?'
ESRC North West Doctoral Training Centre Studentship – Social Statistics Pathway AQM
Supervisors: Prof Hill Kulu; Dr David Lucy
Description: Research on health and mortality by marital status shows lower mortality rates and better health for married persons in comparison to single and separated individuals. Those differences, usually stronger for men than for women, persist even when controlling for socio-demographic and economic characteristics of individuals. Changes in England and Wales over the last 40 years - such as rise in cohabitation, divorce rates, lone parent families, and life expectancy – invite a re-evaluation of these differences. Besides health, mortality and survival analysis, some other interests of mine are ageing, biodemography and historical demography. - Email Sebastian

Alina Pelikh

Alina Pelikh

'Transition to Adulthood in Britain: The analysis of life trajectories of young adults' 
ESRC North West Doctoral Training Centre Studentship – Social Statistics Pathway AQM
Supervisors: Prof Hill Kulu, Dr. Paul Williamson, and Dr. Gemma Catney
Description: The distinguishing British pattern of the transition to adulthood is characterized by early transitions from school to work and heterogeneous household and family formation. In order to take a holistic life course view and look into young people’s employment and education, partnership and family, housing and residential careers, I apply techniques of multistate event history analysis to the British Household Panel Survey data. - Email Alina

You can find out more about my research here: www.liverpool.academia.edu/AlinaPelikh

Philip Sapiro

Philip Sapiro

'The Geography of the Anglo-Jewish Population in the Twenty First Century: Spatial Distribution, Characteristics, and Trends'
University of Liverpool 
Supervisors: Paul Williamson, Gemma Catney, and Hill Kulu
Description: The inclusion of a question on religion in the England and Wales censuses of 2001 and 2011 has opened up the possibility of examination of the geographic distribution of people by this aspect of their cultural identity, and changes over time.  Jews represent just 0.5% of the population but they have been present in material numbers in Britain longer than other comparable sized groups.   The research considers heterogeneity of characteristics of Anglo-Jewry through the use of geodemographic analysis; it examines the current spatial distribution and recent internal migration of the group and asks whether Jews act as pathfinders for more recently arrived groups; and, based on 2001-2011 trends, it considers the future disposition of Jews in England and Wales. – Email Philip

Leo Singer

'Comorbidities, socio-economic and residential contexts: multilevel modelling of their interaction among the elderly and mid-age population'
SupervisorsMark Green, Hill Kulu, Karyn Morrissey and Yoav Ben-Shlomo
Description: The number of people with comorbidities (two or more chronic diseases or conditions) in the UK is rapidly growing. Initial research into the population dynamics of comorbidities has found strong socio-economic gradient associated with comorbidity, as well as the role of area deprivation. My research aims to follow up on these findings by extending the analysis over the life course of individuals and taking into account multi-scalar and mobile geography of residence. - Email Leo

Linda Woods

Linda Woods

'Space Time Data Mining of Reporting of Injuries, Diseases ad Dangerous Occurrences Regulations Dataset'
ESRC CASE Award Studentship 
SupervisorsChris Lloyd and Alex Singleton
Description: In partnership with the Health and Safety Executive, this research explores geographical differences in the determinants of accident prevalence. By applying a range of modelling and data analysis techniques to RIDDOR, a HSE database of recorded accident data, this project identifies the link between socio-economic area characteristics and seasonal/temporal patterns with workplace accidents in Great Britain. - Email Linda

Website: http://geographicdatascience.com