Seminars and Events in the School

 


Marine ecology, oceanography, fisheries and impacts of offshore renewable energy

Date: 28th February 2019
Venue: University of Liverpool, Jane Herdman Building, Jane Herdman Lecture Theatre

Abstract to follow

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Marine predator ecology, including movements and interactions with with man-made structures and fisheries

Date: 14th March 2019
Venue: University of Liverpool, Jane Herdman Building, Jane Herdman Lecture Theatre

Abstract to follow

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Macroecology of marine ecosystems

Date: 28th March 2019
Venue: University of Liverpool, Life Sciences Building – LT2 (172)

Abstract to follow

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Roxby Lectures

Towards inclusive, sustainable and dignified cities

Date: To be rescheduled at a later date.

The Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Liverpool celebrated its Centenary in 2017, marking 100 years since Percy Maude Roxby was established as the first John Rankin Professor of Geography. This makes Liverpool the oldest Honours School in Geography in Britain. Professor Roxby delivered many public lectures in his career, and we continue to celebrate his contribution through our Roxby Lecture Series. 


Governing the Anthropocene

Date: 21st February 2019
Time: 18:00 - 19:30
Venue: University of Liverpool, Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6

This talk explores some of the major moral, legal, and practical challenges of the Anthropocene and how we might confront them. Many of the questions raised in the literature are not data gaps, but normative questions about decision-making, responsibility, and social desirability that lie in that tricky grey area known as ‘governance’. Focusing on my research in Europe and Australia for my forthcoming book, Governing the Anthropocene: Novel Ecosystems, Transformation and Environmental Policy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), we will explore how large-scale challenges such as climate change, wildfire, and significant socio-economic transitions are undermining conventional ideas of who decides, how we act, and even why we take action.

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Desertification: patterns, processes and strategies

Date: 7th March 2019
Time: 18:00 - 19:30
Venue: University of Liverpool, Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6

The Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Liverpool celebrated its Centenary in 2017, marking 100 years since Percy Maude Roxby was established as the first John Rankin Professor of Geography. This makes Liverpool the oldest Honours School in Geography in Britain. Professor Roxby delivered many public lectures in his career, and we continue to celebrate his contribution through our Roxby Lecture Series.

Register for the Event


To move or not to move? Immobility, opportunity and inequality

Date: 21st March 2019
Time: 18:00 - 19:15
Venue: University of Liverpool, Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6

The Department of Geography and Planning at the University of Liverpool celebrated its Centenary in 2017, marking 100 years since Percy Maude Roxby was established as the first John Rankin Professor of Geography. This makes Liverpool the oldest Honours School in Geography in Britain. Professor Roxby delivered many public lectures in his career, and we continue to celebrate his contribution through our Roxby Lecture Series.

Register for the Event


Radar monitoring of coastal change – revealing new behaviours

Date: 2nd May 2019
Time: 18:00 - 19:30
Venue: University of Liverpool, Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6

Techniques for characterising and understanding the coast have undergone significant advances in the last decade, providing researchers and resource managers with data that reveal new behaviours and trajectories. This lecture explores the use of marine radar and associated technologies for mapping shorelines and capturing data on coastal hydrodynamics, and how these data can be used for both operational and strategic planning for achieving coastal resilience.
This talk is co-sponsored by the RGS Cheshire and North Wales Regional Committee.

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International migration: Busting myths!

Date: 16th May 2019
Time: 18:00 - 19:30
Venue: University of Liverpool, Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6

Globally, 258 million people lived outside their country of birth in 2017. International migration is a key ingredient of human development and has remained a burning political issue for national governments. This lecture will first provide a summary of the main geographical patterns of international migration before offering empirical evidence to bust common misconceptions about the impact of immigration on host destination countries.
This talk is co-sponsored by the RGS Cheshire and North Wales Regional Committee.

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How river catchments respond to rainfall

Date: 6th June 2019
Time: 18:00 - 19:30
Venue: University of Liverpool, Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6

Understanding how river catchments respond to rainfall is critical for predicting flooding and understanding the impact of storms on sediment erosion. My talk provides an overview of how we monitor and predict catchment response, and analyses why catchments respond in different ways to storm events. The talk is aimed at a general audience with no previous understanding of hydrology.
This talk is co-sponsored by the RGS Cheshire and North Wales Regional Committee.

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New insights to the British Ice Sheet

Date: 20th June 2019
Time: 18:00 - 19:30
Venue: University of Liverpool, Rendall Building, Lecture Theatre 6

Over the last six-years, the BRITICE-CHRONO consortium has established the timing and pace of retreat displayed by the last British-Irish Ice Sheet using a systematic dating of glacial sediments and landforms. More than 600 new ages measured by radiocarbon, luminescence and cosmogenic methods have refined understanding of ice retreat for eight key transects aligned down major former ice streams and outlet glaciers often extending from the continental shelf break to onshore. This talk will explore the pace of retreat for the whole ice-sheet, with a more detailed focus on past environments in the northwest of England to provide an understanding of ice sheet dynamics and associated controls for the period 28,000 – 15,000 years ago.
This talk is co-sponsored by the RGS Cheshire and North Wales Regional Committee.

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