Sedimentary Geology

Dinfa Barshep

'Title'
Funding
Supervisors: Prof. Richard Worden
Description:  - Email Dinfa

Muhammed Dahiru

'Title'
Funding Status
Supervisors: Richard Worden
Description: . - Email Muhammed

Isabella Masiero

Isabella Masiero

'Developing a new stratigraphic forward model to understand and predict carbonate platform geometries and facies distribution in syn-rift settings'
My project belongs to PD3 (Prediction of Deposition, Deformation and Diagenesis in Carbonate Systems), an industry-funded consortium involving academic staff and PhD students in the Universities of Bergen, Bristol, Manchester and Liverpool.
Supervisors: Prof. Peter Burgess
Description: My research focuses on the development of a numerical 3D stratigraphic forward model of carbonate strata deposited in syn-rift settings. The project started with an existing model, CarboCAT, and is refining existing and developing new algorithms to allow better modelling of the development of carbonate platforms in syn-rift settings. Analysis of the model output for a wide range of input parameters will improve our understand of how syn-rift settings generate various carbonate platform geometries, including carbonate strata shed off the platform tops into deeper water. Generation of 2D and 3D synthetic seismic images from CarboCAT model output will allow prediction of the likely seismic response of carbonate stratal architectures and reservoir heterogeneities formed in syn-rift settings. The final outcome of my project will be modelling tools and a database of results to assist seismic interpretation and carbonate facies prediction in complex extensional environments. - Email Isabella

Teo Nagy

'Title'
Funding Status
Supervisors: Dr Rob Duller
Description: . - Email 

Naboth Simon

'Title'
Funding Status
Supervisors: Richard Worden
Description: . - Email 

Stephan Toby

Stephan Toby

'Linking cyclicity from terrestrial to marine sedimentary successions'
NERC DTP
Supervisors: Dr Rob Duller and Dr Silvio De Angelis
Description: My research will focus on a fundamental aspect of stratigraphy: the presence of hierarchical organization and cyclicity at the full range of physical scales. Hierarchical cyclicity of this kind can be generated by autogenic process and allogenic processes. However, there is considerable ambiguity over what process dominates the stratigraphic record and under what conditions these processes dominate. The goal of my studentship is to elucidate the nature of clastic stratigraphic record, from the land-system to the marine-system with a focus on fan systems. To do this, laboratory experiments and numerical experiments will be used to test a theoretical framework, which will then be applied to a field-scale sedimentary succession. - Email Stephan

James Utley

'Geochemical controls on iron rich clay mineral genesis and transformation in the eogenetic zone'
Funding Status
Supervisors: Prof Richard Worden and Dr Rob Duller
Description: Clay minerals form by the weathering of igneous and metamorphic minerals at or near Earth’s surface. The weathering conditions largely control the types of clay minerals formed, so we can potentially investigate Earth’s past climate by the clays preserved in sedimentary rocks.  To do this we must understand how temperature, rainfall, topography, and the action of plants and animals affects the formation of the various clays. I study part of this story, by investigating the clay minerals formed from volcanic rocks in a warm and wet tropical climate. And no, I didn’t choose to do this for the weather in the field area, a pale and chubby Brummie doesn’t do well in a hot country… This sort of research can be of interest to the energy industry, where certain clays can prove beneficial to oil reservoirs. Another area of research I would like to explore, is the impact these clay minerals and weathering processes have on the fertility of agricultural land. - Email James

Peter Wooldridge

'Quantification of deltaic architecture through application of mass balance to the rock record'
Funding: NERC DTP
Supervisors: Dr Rob Duller
DescriptionMy research focuses on explaining the spatial-temporal distribution of sediment in deltaic environments through a Source-to-Sink, Process-Based Perspective. Long term variation in mass balance can provide an explanation for morphological and stratigraphic evolution observed in depositional systems. These variations reflect allogenic and autogenic, process based self-organisation. Linking surface processes to self-organisation and overriding system controls can provide enhanced explanation of deltaic architectures. My studentship aims to provide greater understanding of deltaic systems controls and dynamic system processes, generating a framework for the explanation of deltaic architectures. To achieve this, a field-based approach will be combined with numerical and physical modelling. Email Peter