Art and Art History

Choose from a range of blended learning courses. For further information on blended learning click 'What you need to know' in the left hand navigation. 

The Art of the Brontë Sisters

The Art of the Brontë Sisters

2021 marks 175 years since the Brontë sisters’ first publication – a book of poems. With their writings in mind, this course focuses primarily on their lesser known relationship to art. Like their artist brother Branwell (whose work will also be considered), Charlotte, Emily and Anne created their own drawings and paintings. This course looks at their art work, considers the art that influenced them, and addresses the role of art in their poetry and novels. Participants will gain greater insight into the creative life of the Brontë family, and how they fit into the context of the Nineteenth Century art world. With Dr. Anna Maddison, 5 meetings from Wednesday 13 October, 2-4pm.

Sculpture in Liverpool

Sculpture in Liverpool

This course provides an introduction to the wide range of public art in Liverpool, not only in the galleries and museums, but also on the streets, in parks, churches, hotels, libraries....and even around the university precinct and inside faculty buildings. The city's public art, collections and exhibitions played an important part in being awarded UNESCO World Heritage Site Status and 'European Capital of Culture' in 2008. Regular events in the city include Liverpool Biennial, which commissions International artists to create site specific works and many of these have remained as permanent additions to the local artscape (eg Antony Gormley’s, Another Place at Crosby and Ugo Rondinone’s colourful Mountain at the Royal Albert Dock). We will be exploring the public sculpture, monuments, art installations and exhibitions through slide presentations, interactive group discussion and also through virtual street walks. Students will learn about the historical and social significance of public art. The different materials and processes involved in creating art will be discussed along with the issues and debates surrounding patronage, commissioning, making and conservation of works. We will also examine the importance of art to the city of Liverpool: in creating a sense of civic pride and creating an attractive place to live, work and study. With Julie Robson, 6 meetings from Friday 8 October, 10:30am - 12:30 pm.

Realities in Lucian Freud’s portraits

‘Realities’ in Lucian Freud’s portraits

The painter and critic Lawrence Gowing wrote: ‘Freud’s image of the rather few people whom he knows very well indeed becomes the theatre for his realisations of what it entails for us to be physically and imaginatively present to each other.’ (1982). Gowing’s assertion gives shape to the content of this study day which is designed to inform an understanding of Tate Liverpool's upcoming Lucian Freud: Real Lives exhibition. Our discussions will focus on how the ‘reality’ of the human subject was realised in Freud’s portraits (including his self-portraits). We will also consider Herbert Read’s 1951 description of Freud as the ‘Ingres of Existentialism’ (1951) and through close study and critique we will decide if this description held true for the duration of Freud’s career. Can portraiture capture the objectivity of what is seen but at the same time reveal the painter’s personal vision of seeing? With Dr. Judith Walsh, 1 meeting from Saturday 4 December, 10am - 1pm.

Dada and Surrealism: Anarchy and the Alchemy of Desire

Dada and Surrealism: Anarchy and the Alchemy of Desire

Dada was launched in 1916 in Zurich, and in 1924 the first Manifesto of Surrealism was published in Paris. A century later their legacies are still significant. In this module we take an inter-disciplinary look at Dada in the context of the First World War, and then Surrealism in its heyday between the world wars, as it transcended Dada and sought to unify poetry, art, cinema, psychology and politics into an international revolutionary movement. With David Rice, 10 sessions from Thursday 7 October, 7-9pm.