Classics and Ancient History MPhil/PhD

Major code: HCMR


About us

Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology

The Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology (ACE) is one of the major international centres for studying the ancient world and archaeology, but what makes us really exciting is the way we combine all aspects of ancient culture and material, literary and documentary, into one research environment.

School of Histories, Languages and Cultures

This School brings together anumber of internationally recognised centres of excellence for research and teaching. With the departments themselves steeped in history, and teaching stretching back for more than 100 years in numerous disciplines, there is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity that generates a lively culture,with staff and students from all disciplines interacting through institutional research groups and forums.

The School comprises the following areas of study:
  • History
  • Archives and Records Management
  • Irish Studies
  • Politics
  • Archaeology, Classics, Egyptology
  • Cultures, Languages and Area Studies

Research groups

The School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology has a number of research groups, which together reflect our major research strengths; those areas where we are recognised internationally. Each of these groups is a dynamic forum for the exchange of concepts and information and has a vibrant seminar series providing an opportunity for staff and postgraduates to integrate their research activities and interact with major external figures in their fields.

Staff research interests

Staff are interested in supervising PhD and MPhil projects in the following areas:

DR COLIN ADAMS
E: colin.adams@liv.ac.uk
Roman imperial history, ancient economy, Roman Egypt.

DR ZOFIA ARCHIBALD
E: z.archibald@liv.ac.uk
Ancient economies, especially Greek/Hellenistic; archaeology of Iron Age Europe; the Black Sea region in Antiquity.

DR ELENI ASOUTI
E: e.asouti@liv.ac.uk
Archaeobotany, Eastern Mediterranean prehistory.

DR DOUGLAS BAIRD
E: d.baird@liv.ac.uk
Near Eastern prehistory, lithic analysis, complex societies.

PROFESSOR LAWRENCE BARHAM
E: l.s.barham@liv.ac.uk
Palaeolithic archaeology, human evolution, African archaeology.

DR VIOLAINE CHAUVET
E: vchauvet@liv.ac.uk
Egyptian archaeology, Funerary architecture, Old Kingdom.

DR MARK COLLIER
E:m.a.collier@liv.ac.uk
Egyptian language, Egyptian texts, subjectivity and life-world in Ancient Egypt.

DR BEN EDWARDS
E: benjamin.edwards@liverpool.ac.uk
Neolithic of NW Europe; archaeological theory and ethics; contemporary excavation practices.

DR ROLAND ENMARCH
E: r.enmarch@liv.ac.uk
Egyptian literature, Egyptian language, Egyptian rhetoric.

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER EYRE
E: ceyre@liv.ac.uk
Egyptian economic social and religious history; Egyptian texts.

DR MATTHEW FITZJOHN
E:mpf21@liv.ac.uk
Italian prehistory; landscape archaeology; GIS.

DR PHILIP FREEMAN
E: p.w.m.freeman@liv.ac.uk
Roman provincial archaeology; archaeological field methods.

DR DUNCAN GARROW
E: duncan.garrow@liv.ac.uk
British and NW European prehistory; archaeological theory and material culture studies; contemporary excavation practices.

PROFESSOR BRUCE GIBSON
E: bjgibson@liv.ac.uk
Latin language and literature.

DR GLENN GODENHO
E: glenn.godenho@liv.ac.uk
Inscriptional and archaeological contexts of Ancient Egyptian social display.

PROFESSOR JOHN GOWLETT
E: gowlett@liv.ac.uk
Palaeolithic and early hominid studies; palaeoanthropology; radiocarbon dating.

DR ALANGREAVES
E: greaves@liv.ac.uk
Bronze Age and Archaic Greek archaeology; Iron Age and Roman Britain.

PROFESSOR THOMAS HARRISON
E: t.harrison@liv.ac.uk
Ancient Greek history and culture.

DR FIONA HOBDEN
E: f.hobden@liv.ac.uk
Ancient Greek literature, culture, and identity.

DR CLAIRE HOLLERAN
E: c.holleran@liv.ac.uk
Roman social and economic history.

DR FREDERICK JONES
E: fjones@liv.ac.uk
Roman satire and novel; Latin linguistics.

DR JENNIFER KEWLEY DRASKAU
E: j.kewley-draskau@liv.ac.uk
Manx language and culture; the texts produced by German speakingWW1 internees, chiefly in the Isle of Man.

DR CATRIONA MACKIE
E: cmackie@liv.ac.uk
Vernacular architecture and the built environment; the Gaelic languages.

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER MEE
E: cmee@liv.ac.uk
Minoan-Mycenaean and Classical Greek archaeology.

DR HAROLD MYTUM
E: h.mytum@liv.ac.uk
Western Britain and Ireland, Iron Age - 20th century; global historical archaeology.

DR GRAHAM OLIVER
E: g.oliver@liv.ac.uk
Ancient Greek history and epigraphy.

DR JOANNA PAUL
E: joanna.paul@liv.ac.uk
Classical Receptions, Classical Studies.

DR JESSICA PEARSON
E: jessica.pearson@liv.ac.uk
Palaeodiet, stable isotope studies, human osteology.

DR MATTHEW PONTING
E:m.ponting@liv.ac.uk
Metallurgy and materials science, Roman coinage, ICP-AES analysis.

DR RACHEL POPE
E: rachel.pope@liv.ac.uk
British Prehistoric architecture, use of landscapes, social change.

DR APRIL PUDSEY
E: apudsey@liv.ac.uk
Roman Egypt, family and demography.

DR BRUCE ROUTLEDGE
E: bruce.routledge@liv.ac.uk
Iron and Bronze Age Near East, state formation, material culture studies.

DR IAN SHAW
E: ishaw@liv.ac.uk
Egyptian archaeology and history; ancient Egyptian technology.

DR ANTHONY SINCLAIR
E: a.g.m.sinclair@liv.ac.uk
Palaeolithic archaeology (Middle and Upper Palaeolithic in Southern Europe, Africa and Japan); archaeological theory and the anthropology of technology.

DR STEVEN SNAPE
E: s.r.snape@liv.ac.uk
Egyptian archaeology, architecture, art.

DR MICHAEL SOMMER
E:michael.sommer@liv.ac.uk
Roman history, the Roman Near East, the Phoenicians.

PROFESSOR CHRISTOPHER TUPLIN
E: c.j.tuplin@liv.ac.uk
The Achaemenid Empire; Greek history/historiography, especially Xenophon.

DR MAGNUS WIDELL
E:m.widell@liv.ac.uk
Early Mesopotamian history, economy, languages and texts.

DR ALEXEI ZADOROZHNYY
E: avzadoro@liv.ac.uk
Greek literature, historiography and philosophy.

 

Facilities

The Ancient World and Archaeology has been studied at Liverpool since the 1880s, so we've had plenty of time to build up an enviable library and a fantastic museum.

The Garstang Museum, which is in the SACE building, has outstanding archaeological collections, along with extensive laboratory facilities for conservation, lithics, geomagnetism, stable isotope, trace elements, finds processing and sample preparation.

We also have a GIS suite with facilities for archaeological drawing and offer 24-hour access for taught students to a dedicated Student Resource Centre, complete with PCs, personal lockers, desk space, wi fi and a networked printer.

Postgraduate research students will usually be allocated a shared office with computing facilities and an allocation of subsidised printing and inter-library loans.

Matthew Fitzjohn

The School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Liverpool is an internationally recognised centre for research in Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology with 40 members of staff and over 100 postgraduates. Our teaching is research driven. So you will find that you will study and be involved in debates on the most up-to-date research with world leading academics. We also have excellent Library facilities with collections covering all areas of the department’s specialisms.

How long have you worked at the university?

Since 2002

Are you mainly involved in teaching/research (what’s the split?)

That depends on the time in the calendar year. During the teaching terms, the majority of my working week is spent teaching or working on University tasks. I am lucky to have one day during the week to focus on research. For the summer months (mid June through to mid September) the majority of my time is spent on research, however, I will spend time (the equivalent of one to two days per week) on admissions, supervising PhD or MA students or other University tasks.

Tell me more about this i.e. what’s your research about?

Currently, I am writing a book that is inspired by an interest in the importance of houses in our lives, not only as places where we sleep and eat but as places that are constructed by us and which shape our sense of our place in the world. It is motivated by a desire to explore the changing experiences of everyday life associated with domestic structures, in a period when settlements were transformed from villages to city-states, in the area that is now Greece and southern Italy. My research covers a pivotal period in European social history: from the Iron Age into the Archaic and Classical periods of ancient Greece (c. 1000 BCE to 348 BCE).

My work combines insights derived from a wide range of archaeological thought, human geography, anthropology and architecture and draws upon the theoretical writing of a diverse range of authors, including Bourdieu, Merleau Ponty, Tuan and Bhabha.

Does your research take you anywhere interesting e.g. foreign countries, important sites/projects?

I am fortunate enough to work in the Mediterranean. In the last few years, I’ve worked in Sicily, on Stromboli, in Central Italy and in Greece.

Do you collaborate with anyone?

I have collaborated with a number of other academics and different institutions. It is one of the most interesting aspects of being involved in research projects. At the moment I am completing a book, so most of my time is spent working on my own at my desk. I’m currently developing a collaborative project with archaeologists in Italy.

What modules do you teach on which programmes?  Do you teach large/small groups?

I teach on the MA Archaeology and MA Ancient History. I teach a module called Taste and Desire in Pre-Roman Italy and I’m also involved in a number of team-taught modules including Material Culture of the Greco-Roman Worlds, Professional Skills for the Archaeologist and Key Themes in Archaeological Interpretation. Class sizes vary from one-to-one tutorials through to seminars with about 15 students. The majority of postgraduate seminars are taught in small groups.

What have some of your students gone on to do?

Our postgraduate students have gone on to a diverse range of employment. I have taught students on the MA who have completed doctorates either in Liverpool or in other institutions in the UK or abroad. A number of students have successfully entered into work in the cultural heritage sector (Governmental work, English Heritage, Museums) and teaching. Students have also used the MA to develop a range of skills that have been essential for gaining postgraduate level employment.

What do you love most about the University of Liverpool?

The university is located in the heart of both the contemporary and historical city.  It is a really stimulating place to work. My teaching and research have been greatly influenced by architecture and social history of the city. I’m able to take my teaching out of the classroom and into the city to World Heritage sites, listed buildings and Victorian cemeteries.

Why should prospective students study a postgraduate qualification here? What are the benefits?

The School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Liverpool is an internationally recognised centre for research in Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology with 40 members of staff and over 100 postgraduates. Our teaching is research driven. So you will find that you will study and be involved in debates on the most up-to-date research with world leading academics. We also have excellent Library facilities with collections covering all areas of the department’s specialisms.

Your degree will enable you to develop your subject knowledge and allow you grapple with the fundamental theoretical issues and debates in Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology. You will be able to combine your chosen field of regional or period research specialisation with a broader understanding of the wider intellectual issues within the discipline. Our degrees will provide a good preparation for a research degree but they are also intended to answer the needs of students who wish to master certain skills and expertise as a means to building a career in the cultural heritage sector or to enhance their transferable skills for other types of career.

What does your department/subject, in particular, offer a prospective student?

The School was recently ranked fifth in the UK by the Guardian’s 2012 Good University Guide for Archaeology. Much of this is a result of high rates of student satisfaction: no less than 97% of our students are satisfied with their course. We are dedicated to delivering innovative, high quality teaching.  The School hosts the prestigious Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for History, Classics and Archaeology and our two National Teaching Fellows contribute actively to the continuing development of our teaching methods.